Monday, June 15, 2009

Has The Twitter Bubble Burst?

Dropoff in Twitter TrafficLarry Bodine writes that the Twitter hype is over, and makes the arg- ument against Twitter as a marketing tool for lawyers and law firms. I agree with him. I have seen absolutely no tangible return from my energy investment in Twitter. And I don't buy into the argument that the intagibles are just as important as the tangibles. Either the tool provides a measurable marketing return, or you move on to something else. It is time to move on from Twitter. Here is what Larry has to say.

Like CB radios, Twitter is turning out to be a fad that has peaked. Check the facts:

  • The number of Twitter users has started to decline according to Quantcast.
  • At best, Twitter’s growth suddenly stopped in May, according to Compete.com.
  • 55% of people who signed up for an account never posted a tweet, according to HubSpot's State of the Twittersphere.
  • 56% of people with a Twitter account are not following anyone, according to HubSpot.
  • 53% of Twitter account holders have no followers themselves.
  • 76% of users have not entered a bio in their profile,
  • There is a huge drop in use of Tweetdeck (an application many Twitters use to organize tweets) dropped from 915,000 to 476,000 between April and May, according to Social Media Insider.
  • 10% of Twitter users accounted for over 90% of tweets, according to Harvard Business School.
  • The average Twitter user tweets once and never again, according to Harvard.
twitter

The evidence continues to support my article, Twitter Not Effective for Law Firm Marketing.

Please click here for Larry's original article.

Now I can't wait for the gasoline to hit the fire as all those who have drunk the Twitter Cool-Aid berate Larry for being so bold as to criticize the Twitter craze.

Please be sure to visit www.hardinglaw.com, the website for the law firm of Harding & Associates, for more information on California family law.

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